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the night, sans stars by Benjamin Benne
February 2017

It’s 2016, an early evening and Trump is on the news talking about his wall, as a mother and a daughter prepare for life-changing exams. 33-year-old Alma is practicing for her U.S. citizenship test, while 16 year-old, California-born Angel has her SAT the next day (and isn’t studying). the night, sans stars is a play about love, sacrifice, and trying to find your feet in today’s United States.


Pride and Prejudice adapted by Kate Hamill
February 2017

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Pride and Prejudice ranks among author Jane Austen’s works as one of her best. Playwright Kate Hamill imbues new life into this classic love story with a decidedly progressive take on the trials and travails of Elizabeth Bennet, Mr. Darcy, and of course the delightful Bennet clan.


I’ll Get You Back Again by Sarah Gancher
December 2016

I’ll Get You Back Again is set in Berkeley and is a bittersweet comedy with music. Struggling stand-up comedian Chloe is sitting in for her dead father as the bassist for his seminal psychedelic rock band. As rehearsals progress, Chloe finds herself navigating increasingly delicate emotional terrain as old conflicts flare up and old flirtations reignite. By turns comic and tragic, scathing and tender, the play is a meditation on what we inherit from the 60s the joys and frustrations of collaboration, and the search for transcendence in art and comedy.


The Grove by Mfoniso Udofia
November 2016

Adiagha Ufot, first generation offspring and eldest daughter of a transplanted Nigerian family, is both conduit of her rich culture and fulfiller of the legacy of the American dream. Adiagha struggles to balance as her Nigerian history and her American present collide and combust.


The Burdens by Matt Schatz
November 2016

Mordy is a struggling musician living in Los Angeles. His older sister Jane is a successful attorney and a mother of three in New Jersey. But when their widowed mother's life becomes emotionally and financially taxed by her terrible, centenarian father, these two adult siblings are drawn together into an elaborate plot to relieve their mother's burden and their own. Told almost entirely via text messages, The Burdens is a dark, family comedy about how technology helps keep us close, while still enabling us to keep our distance. Let’s face it: it's easier to type something than it is to say it face to face. But watch out for that auto-correct. It can be murder.


MAC BETH adapted by Erica Schmidt
June 2016

In playwright/director Erica Schmidt’s innovative adaptation, seven young women gather after school to re-tell the story of Macbeth, Shakespeare’s epic tragedy about the corrosive effects of ambition. Witches, ghosts, and prophecies drive this tale of a Scottish general who believes he is destined to be king of Scotland. And as the girls immerse themselves further and further in this infamous tragedy, the line between real life and bloody fantasy becomes increasingly blurred.


Oubliettes by Yussef El Guindi
May 2016

When Muaz agrees to meet an older man, Rupert, for a discreet encounter, he isn’t expecting his race to be the thing that makes him the ideal submissive in his new partner’s eyes. It likewise comes as a surprise to Muaz when Rupert turns out to be a prominent Islamophobic pundit—especially one scheduled to debate a fiery female Muslim activist, Enas, who also happens to be Muaz’s wife. As Rupert and Enas converge, questions of sex, religion, race, and cultural tradition start to swirl around Muaz and his family, each presenting their own dark and inescapable truths.


Wolf Play by Hansol Jung
May 2016

A Lone Wolf stands onstage. He holds in his hands the puppet of a Korean boy floating between alien worlds. A father who adopted a young Korean boy is overwhelmed by a new baby in his house and answers an ad seeking a child. He transfers his adopted son’s custody to Ash and Robin, two women who are at very different stages of wanting children in their lives. The boy’s new mothers attempt to make this Lone Wolf feel at home in these new surroundings, but the Wolf finds it is as terrifying and foreign as his last. Survival, quick instincts, and a fighting stance stand the Wolf in good stead as the adults surrounding him try to sort out what it means to be a parent, a spouse, a sibling, a child, a family. And what it means to be a fighter alone in the ring. Can this Lone Wolf find his own version of a pack?


Unseen by Mona Mansour
April 2016

Conflict photographer Mia wakes up in the Istanbul apartment of her on-again, off-again girlfriend after being found unconscious at the scene of a massacre she was photographing. Mia can’t even remember being there, but she had apparently wired photos of the site hours before she was found. The two women resume their volatile push-pull relationship when Mia’s well-meaning Californian mother arrives from the U.S., trying to help unravel what happened to her daughter.


Ibsen in Chicago by David Grimm
January 2016

In 1882, an unlikely ensemble of scrappy Scandinavian immigrants converge to put on a play in boomtown Chicago. As this ragtag group of new Americans rehearse a controversial new play written by their fellow countryman Henrik Ibsen, their various enmities and misunderstandings take on vaudevillian proportions. Bricklayer turned impresario Henning Folden has a chance to fulfill a dream, but first he has to keep the real world at bay and get his cast to opening night in this world premiere comedy.


Sherlock Holmes and The American Problem by R. Hamilton Wright
December 2015

The American Wild West and Victorian England collide in this original adventure tale. The year is 1887, the occasion is the Queen Victoria’s Jubilee, and the coincidences are suspiciously piling up...


Dry Powder by Sarah Burgesstober
October 2015

This gripping new dark comedy delves into the world of those who have the power to manipulate the American economy. Rick, a private equity firm president creates a PR nightmare when he throws himself an extravagant engagement party after forcing massive layoffs at his company. Seth, one of Rick’s managing directors desperately attempts to rectify the situation by pursuing a luggage company ready to be taken to the next level. But Jenny, Seth’s ice-cold colleague at the firm, suggests a countermove that spells disaster for the “little guy.” Sarah Burgess’ engrossing play opens a window into the high-stakes world of high finance. It’s play or be played.